Sunday, 8 February 2009

THE BLUE IN THE AIR 2008 ALBUMS: NUMBERS 90-80











90. THOMAS FERSEN: Trois Petits Tours

…et dans le fôret, un homme takes his valise and becomes a fairy godfather, in the cool mists of early spring. Tout le monde est nouvel et douce, in the branches balloons rest and tiny flowers sprout from the mud…




89. PLANTS AND ANIMALS: Parc Avenue

Elsewhere in Montreal , hiver is over and the first warmth spreads down the street, the traumas are gone with the snow and gentle breezes give you time and space to think. Why not walk to where the birds and bees live, to hear mating songs?

88. LUCINDA WILLIAMS: Little Honey

Turn it up, full blast, knowing that it is the real, actual thing. What has been longed for has happened. How long did it take? How many redemptions, sacrifices? Go to the top of the heath, the roof, and feel that circle, a long line at long last connected…

87. LADY GAGA: The Fame

…and when did it start? Disorientation. A sense of being a teenager and staking nights, lost in bars, in clubs, relationships dissolving in a phrase, a gesture. The clock in World’s End, the winking men, the GLAMOUR overrides and justifies all.

86. AKON: Freedom

Then there is the destination; the kind of security which only comes with true achievement; the man stands immaculate, but not uncaring, beside a perfect sea and an air of new blue. Freedom through machines; the tool of the indolent converted to a believer of ardent red, now, now, now.

85. BUSY SIGNAL: Loaded

Meanwhile the reversed clock in World’s End pronounces: “Tic Tic Toc,” a Numan PacMan chant of new muzik, striking in the dancehall, ominous enough even to incorporate and impregnate “Beat It” within its silvery musculature.

84. FLO RIDA: Mail On Sunday

Does he not deserve to prosper? 1965 Motown pleading retooled for the spaceship of the steely hip, guttural (“Low”) and all compass points centring on her “JAM” in the middle of “In The Ayer” before spreading it into strawberry Sundays of unlikely socialism.

83. KANO : 140 Grime St .
82. SKEPTA: Greatest Hits
81. GHETTO: Freedom Of Speech
80. CHASE AND STATUS: More Than A Lot

And then grime came back, as, rather less expectedly, did drum n’ bass; but as true collectivist music neither really lent themselves towards easy in/out door bogus evaluations. Kano frames the picture admirably; back on his own terms, sounding freer and lighter. The Skepta collection is a stray ray from 2007 (the first of four) which we felt it vital to include in this tale; the infectious impudence of that title spread generously throughout hilarious, pioneering storms of sneaky. Ghetto was impatient but not impudent or impotent – always on time, as were the geared-even motors of Chase and Status; less showy than Pendulum (does anyone else recall Therapy??), they chopped their drums into sublime new screws, and Kano ’s guest demolition derby, aided by Rawls and Axelrod, crashed through the corrugated grey into the peachy sunshine.

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